360 Degrees Leadership Development Assessment Instrument

Name of person being rated: ……………………………………………….

Name of person doing the rating       ……………………………………………….

Date:………………….

Following are competencies that represent knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes of successful leaders. Please read the description of each competency and then rate the individual identified above, using the following key:

5 = Exceptional; 4 = Very good; 3 = Good; 2 = Needs Improvement, 1 = Very weak

  1. Creating a Vision and Setting Goals. Without clear goals, followers perceive their work to have less purpose and impact and are less inclined to participate. A good leaders has a clear vision about what needs to be accomplished and is able to set realistic goals to achieve that vision.
  2. Explaining and Communicating Expectations. Employees want to know and understand expectations for individual and group performance. Without these expectations, feedback is not as meaningful as it could be, making it difficult for individuals or a group to achieve goals and successes. Good leaders are clear about reporting relationships, and they establish evaluation criteria that are fair and appropriate.
  3. Written Communication. The successful leader writes clearly and concisely at the level needed by the person(s) receiving the information. In other words, the leader writes to express, not impress.
  4. Oral Communication. Good leaders inform others about what is going on and why. The leader engages in frank discussion about issues and how those issues affect individuals, and structures meetings to provide for needed dialogue.
  5. Personal Integrity. Personal integrity is becoming more and more an issue in the workplace. Good leaders demonstrate and model integrity in day-to-day interactions by:
    • Establishing a relationship of trust.
    • Being honest (even if it means making a different decision than the one recommended).
    • Treating everyone fairly.
    • Delivering on promises and meeting commitments.
    • Placing personal needs (ego) in second place to needs of the overall group; and
    • Admitting mistakes and accepting constructive criticism.
  6. Creativity and Experimentation.  Great leaders value and establish an organizational climate built on trust and openness in order to ensure that creativity and new ideas flourish. Leaders encourage others to experiment and learn from mistakes, without fear of retribution. They are known for their out-of-the-box thinking.
  7. Nuturing. Good leaders demonstrate that they care about and are interested in others’ individual growth by:
    • Noticing the work and accomplishments of the individual as a person;
    • Exhibiting understanding and empathy for a variety of personality types;
    • Saying ‘thank you’ for a job well done;
    • Caring about individuals’ personal and professional growth; and
    • Seeking input on decisions that others will be affected by.
  8. Decisiveness. Leaders make decisions in a timely and effective manner and explain the basis for their decisions. Ideal leaders base decisions on facts and priorities, rather than trying to please everyone. They know when to seek consensus as part of the decision-making process.
  9. Making Appropriate Interventions. Leaders must trust subordinates. Good leaders know when to leave a subordinate or team member alone to get the job done and when to make an intervention to resolve issues that are beyond the subordinate’s or team member’s span of control.
  10. Active Listening. Good leaders are available, attentive, unbiased and responsive. They recognize the need to allow input as well as to follow up on the input given. Good leaders are open-minded and encourage other points of view. They frequently paraphrase what is being said to ensure that they understand the speaker’s point.
  11. Assertiveness. Most people will acknowledge that the leader’s role is not an easy one, especially in dealing with conflict. Conflict is a daily occurrence in the workplace. Good leaders understand that personality and other work conflicts do not go away, that they typically get worse if not addressed. Thus, leaders deal with conflict in a timely, straightforward manner. They are assertive and honest with all parties in dealing with any type of conflict.
  12. Delegating. The ability to delegate effectively and focus on performance and results is a key element of leadership. Leaders demonstrate trust by delegating authority along with responsibility. However, the leader must know subordinates and their capabilities in order to delegate effectively. Good leaders understand that effective delegation enhances team members’ and subordinates’ skills and ultimately leads to a higher success rate.
  13. Fostering Team Building. The best leaders are known for promoting team efforts. They recognize and reward individuals for outstanding performances. However, they work to minimize and eliminate harmful competitiveness that may undermine the team. Leaders continuously discourage we – they attitudes.
  14. Acting as an Advocate. Leaders are expected to be the ‘point persons’ and to be responsible to the needs of the team. They have a dual loyalty, to team members as well as to others, particularly upper management. Leaders are advocates not only for an individual, but also for the team, the department and the organization as a whole.
  15. Appraisal and Feedback. Good leaders are knowledgeable about what is required to get the job done and who is doing it. They engage in ‘management by walking around’ to learn about work status. They also solicit input from internal as well as external customers concerning satisfaction. They use this data to provide appropriate and timely feedback to everyone concerned. Good leaders also distinguish between good and poor work and take the appropriate action (e.g., reward or recognition for good performance; coaching or corrective action for poor performance).
  16. Coaching. An ideal leader spends considerable time in devising professional development guidance for staff. The leader engages in the following types of activities, as appropriate:
    • Tell the purpose and importance of the activity.
    • Explain the process to be used (or allow freedom to design one).
    • Show how it is done, completely and accurately (if it must be done a specific way)
    • Ask whether the person has any questions and clarify if necessary.
    • Observe while the person engages in the process.
    • Provide immediate and specific feedback (coach again or reinforce success).
    • Express confidence in the person’s ability to be successful.
    • Agree on follow-up action(s) as necessary.
  17. Learning. The ideal leader is a lifelong learner who:
    • Is open to change.
    • Engages others in problem solving.
    • Views ideas from different perspectives.
    • Experiments and learns from mistakes.
    • Continues to build his or her own skills as well as the skills of staff members.
  18. Mediating. Leaders must be able to mediate problems between people fairly. Ideal leaders are assertive in using mediation skills when warranted. However, the leader does not take sides, but keeps an open mind, gathers all the information in a thorough manner, and makes decisions based on facts.
  19. Dealing with Critics. Every leader gains some critics. Successful leaders, however, do not tear others down in public. They remain objective. They learn to distinguish between those who are attempting to provide constructive advice and those who have more selfish agendas. They then take the appropriate steps to deal with the situation.
  20. Technical Competence. Leaders are expected to have technical competence. This does not mean that they can do the actual work better than their team members. Rather, it means that they have a basic understanding of what is required and can make informed decisions.

Scoring Interpretation

  • Use the undermentioned Individual Feedback Analysis Worksheet. Collect the assessments, record the results, and compare the ratings (i.e., self versus others). Is there congruence? How varied are the results? Try to understand these differences. Congratulate yourself on any 4s or 5s. Make a note to continue engaging in these successful activities.
  • Next, concentrate on any 1s and 2s. For example, who rated you as a 1 or 2? Prioritize the 1s and 2s in terms of relevance to what you currently do or aspire to do.
  • Seek out the individual(s) who rated you as a 1 or 2 and discuss the rating. Ask for specific feedback (i.e., why they think you are a 1 or 2). Next ask for specific strategies or actions that you might take to improve. If you gave yourself a 1 and 2, discuss with others how you might improve.
  • Focus on one to three relevant competencies that are in most need of improvement. Develop an action plan that includes the competency, an improvement goal, strategy or action for improvement, resources needed, time frame, and method of evaluation. (See the Individual Action Plan Worksheet for suggestions.)
  • Share your strategies and action plan with those who rated you and ask for their continuing support. Set up a tickler system to periodically elicit feedback (e.g., about once every six months). Reward yourself each time you reach an important milestone.

Individual Feedback Analysis Worksheet

Name of person being rated: …………………………………….Date: ………………….

Insert numerical rating from each of the Raters.
                                                                                                       Raters’ scores

 

Competency

1

2

3

4

Notes

1

Creating a Vision and Setting goals

 

 

 

 

 

2

Explaining and Communicating Expectations

 

 

 

 

 

3

Written communication

 

 

 

 

 

4

Oral communication

 

 

 

 

 

5

Personal Integrity

 

 

 

 

 

6

Creativity and experimentation

 

 

 

 

 

7

Nurturing

 

 

 

 

 

8

Decisiveness

 

 

 

 

 

9

Making appropriate interventions

 

 

 

 

 

10

Active listening

 

 

 

 

 

11

Assertiveness

 

 

 

 

 

12

Delegating

 

 

 

 

 

13

Fostering team building

 

 

 

 

 

14

Acting as an advocate

 

 

 

 

 

15

Appraisal and feedback

 

 

 

 

 

16

Coaching

 

 

 

 

 

17

Learning

 

 

 

 

 

18

Mediating

 

 

 

 

 

19

Dealing with critics

 

 

 

 

 

20

Technical competence

 

 

 

 

 

Raters:

  • _______________________              2. ___________________________

 

  • _______________________              4. ___________________________

Individual Action Plan Worksheet

Name: _________________________________ Date: _____________________

It is important that you use a systematic process to ensure that you reach your improvement goal(s). After you have completed your Individual Feedback Analysis Worksheet, select one, two, or three competencies to work on. Use one sheet for each competency. Share your plans with others and encourage them to help you reach your desired goals.
Comptency: ______________________________________________________________
(Identify the competency that you need to work on)

Goal for Improvement: _____________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________
(Be as specific as possible about what you want to improve.)

Strategies or Actions to Take for Improvement:
(Identify several strategies or actions you will take. To the extent possible, answer: Who, What, When, Where, How and Why. This will help you to focus on resources that might be needed. Note: It is perfectly acceptable to delegate certain competencies that a subordinate may perform better than you. However, you need to be clear about what you are doing and why.)

………………………………………………………………………………………………..

………………………………………………………………………………………………..

………………………………………………………………………………………………..

………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Resources needed: _________________________________________________________

Begin by: _____________________________ Target completion date: ______________

Evaluation: _______________________________________________________________
(What data will you collect? From whom? When? How? What are significant milestones?)

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Coaching Inventory – Self

The coaching inventory – Self,  has been developed to help managers assess the extent to which they engage in coaching activities and behaviors, embody coaching philosophies, and create a climate conducive to coaching. It is intended as a method for managers to get a general idea of the extent of their coaching, but not necessarily as a scientifically precise measurement. Managers can use the results, along with other learning and experience (e.g. the Coaching Inventory –Employee, etc.), to begin to determine what areas of coaching may need more of their attention.

Directions

The Coaching Inventory – Self, consists of 35 statements related to coaching. In Part 1, please circle the number of the response that best identifies the extent to which you engage in this activity or behavior, according to the following three-point scale:

  • I rarely or seldom engage in or display this behavior or activity
  • I sometimes or occasionally engage in this behavior or activity.
  • I frequently engage in this behavior or activity.

(Part 2 is a self-scoring key with directions.)

Please fill out this inventory and score yourself. The plotted profile will indicate areas that you may want to work on improving.

Part 1: Coaching Inventory – Self

Directions: Circle the number of the response that best identifies the extent to which you engage in this activity or behavior.

 

 

Rarely or Seldom

Occasionally or Sometimes

Frequently

1

I spend time with my employees to help them develop professionally and in their career

1

2

3

2

I spend time with my employees discussing with them how to perform to their highest abilities.

1

2

3

3

I observe my employees and target any skills or behaviors for further development.

1

2

3

4

When giving feedback to an employee, I prefer to guard the feeling of the employee by softening the feedback

3

2

1

5

When meeting with an employee, I ensure privacy and uninterrupted time

1

2

3

6

In a developmental meeting , I encourage an employee to tell me as much as he or she can about the issue

1

2

3

7

I revise developmental plans that have previously been agreed upon with the employee as needed, and provide further coaching

1

2

3

8

I resist losing my best employees to other opportunities within the company

3

2

1

9

During a formal performance appraisal or employee progress review, I devote time to discussing plans to further improve performance

1

2

3

10

I  identify and communicate the consequenceof an employee not developing to his or her potential

1

2

3

11

In a performance or development discussion, I describe to the employee specifically what the ideal performance or behavior  is

1

2

3

12

In a developmental or performance discussion, we concentrate on my perspective rather than the employee’s

3

2

1

13

I encourage a two-way discussion by asking employees for their perspective on areas for development or improvement

1

2

3

14

I periodically review with employees their progress toward established development goals

1

2

3

15

I set time a side throughout the year, outside of performance appraisal and other formal processes, to discuss each employee’s professional development and advancement

1

2

3

16

I create a work environment that allows employees to change and improve their performance over time

1

2

3

17

When I identify a development need for an employee, I just discuss it with them without worrying about any formal advance planning for the meeting

3

2

1

18

I provide specific feedback to the employee on performance and development and suggest changes for improvement

1

2

3

19

In a development or performance discussion, I pay attention to and consider the employee’s perspective

1

2

3

20

In a meeting with an employee, I tend to concentrate so much on what I want to say that I don’t always hear what the employee is saying

3

2

1

21

I evaluate my employee’s development and reinforce any increase in competence

1

2

3

22

During a formal performance appraisal or employee progress review, I devote time to discussing development and career advancement goals

1

2

3

23

I leave performance discussions to performance appraisal meetings only

3

2

1

24

Before actually conducting a developmental meeting with an employee, I determine specifically what I want the employee to do differently and why 

1

2

3

25

In a developmental meeting, I help the employee to identify barriers to future development and ways to overcome them

1

2

3

26

When meeting with an employee, I show that I am interested and attentive through my nonverbal behaviors, such as facing the employee directly, making eye contact, etc.

1

2

3

27

I make sure I have understood everything an employee has said through behaviors such as concentrating, paraphrasing, and checking for understanding

1

2

3

28

It is not appropriate for me to assist employees in implementing development plans, so I leave them on their own for the most part

3

2

1

29

I help my employees to better understand the expectations of our organizational culture and environment, and how they can impact their professional aspirations

1

2

3

30

I actively identify performance improvement opportunities for individual employees

1

2

3

31

If and when I note a development need or opportunity for an employee, I take time to analyze the situation and to determine the root causes and barriers to improvement

1

2

3

32

I give honest feedback that helps employees to better understand how their behaviors and performance are perceived within the organisation

1

2

3

33

I convey a positive attitude throughout a coaching session that communicates my beliefs in the employee’s ability to reach agreed-upon goals

1

2

3

34

I probe for further information from an employee through behaviors such as concentrating and paraphrasing and checking for understanding

1

2

3

35

I monitor the employee’s use of a skill or behavior that was targeted for improvement on the job

1

2

3

Part 2: Scoring

Directions:

Transfer the numerical values (1,2,3) you have given to each item to the spaces in the columns below. (Please record each individual number carefully, as some of the numerical values change within each column or category.) Add the numbers in each column for a total score for each category.

Commitment toward Professional Development

Commitment toward Performance Development

Assessment, Diagnosis, and Planning

1

2

3

8

9

10

15

16

17

22

23

24

29

30

31

 

Total:

 

Total:

 

Total:

Meeting Face-to-Face and giving Feedback

Attending

Listening and Responding

Implementation and Follow-up

4

5

6

7

11

12

13

14

18

19

20

21

25

26

27

28

32

33

34

35

 

Total:

 

Total:

 

Total:

 

Total:

 

Interpretation

Look at your scores in each category as one indication of the degree to which you use or are committed to this coaching philosophy, behavior or skill.
Scores in the 12 – 15 point range indicate use of or commitment to these coaching areas.
Scores in the 5 – 8 point range indicate areas of coaching on which you may want to focus more attention

Plotting your Profile

To create a profile of your coaching strengths and highlight opportunities for improvement, plot the scores from each of the seven categories on the graph below. Create a plot line by connecting the circled numbers

 

Commitment toward Professional Development

Commitment toward Performance Development

Assessment, Diagnosis, Planning

Meeting Face-toFace and giving Feedback

Attending

Listening, Responding

Implemen
tation,
Follow-up

MOST

15
14
13
12

15
14
13
12

15
14
13
12

15
14
13
12

15
14
13
12

15
14
13
12

15
14
13
12

 

11
10
9

11
10
9

11
10
9

11
10
9

11
10
9

11
10
9

11
10
9

LEAST

8
7
6
5

8
7
6
5

8
7
6
5

8
7
6
5

8
7
6
5

8
7
6
5

8
7
6
5

You may also want to plot your employee’s scores (from the “Employee” inventories) on the graph in a different colour to compare to your own scores.

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